Energy Frequencies

Plants Won’t Grow Near Wi-Fi Routers

Posted on Dec 16, 2013

It’s not difficult to understand the appeal of Wi-Fi.  This revolutionary technology, which has been commercially available since 1999, eliminates cabling and wiring for computers, reduces cellular usage charges and allows us to connect to the Internet from anywhere with a signal.  Despite these benefits, however, studies continue to show that the radiation generated by wireless routers is negatively affecting our health.  In fact, the British activist website Stop Smart Meters recently published a list of 34 scientific studies demonstrating the adverse biological effects of Wi-Fi exposure, including studies linking it to headaches, reduced sperm count and oxidative stress. The latest research into the dangers of Wi-Fi, though, comes from a surprisingly humble source: Five ninth grade female students from Denmark, whose science experiment revealed that wireless radiation is equally as devastating to plants. Undeniable results The experiment began when the five students realized that they had difficulty concentrating in school if they slept near their mobile phones the previous night. Intrigued by this phenomenon, the students endeavored to study the effects of cellphone radiation on humans. Unfortunately, their school prevented them from pursuing this experiment due to a lack of resources, so the students decided to test the effects of Wi-Fi radiation (comparable in strength to cellphone radiation) on a plant instead. The girls placed six trays of Lepidium sativum seeds (a garden cress grown commercially throughout Europe) in a room without radiation, and an equal amount in a room next to two Wi-Fi routers. Over a 12-day period, they observed, measured, weighed and photographed the results. Even before the 12th day arrived, however, the end results were obvious: The cress seeds placed near the routers either hadn’t grown or were completely dead, while the seeds placed in the radiation-free room had blossomed into healthy plants. The experiment earned the five students top honors in a regional science competition. Moreover, according to a teacher at their school, Kim Horsevad, a professor of neuroscience at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden was so impressed with the experiment that he is interested in repeating it in a controlled scientific environment. READ...

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Shocked scientists discover the skin communicates with the liver

Posted on Dec 12, 2013

Shocked scientists discover the skin communicates with the liver

Skin: It is your body’s largest organ, and groundbreaking new research out of Denmark has found that the proper function of your other vital organs is dependent upon its integrity. A collaborative research project out of the University of Southern Denmark (USD) recently discovered that human skin directly communicates and interacts with the rest of the body, meaning that, when it is not in good health, there is a good chance that the same is true about other vital organs. Professor Susanne Mandrup and her team stumbled upon this finding while researching something else, which she says came as quite a shock. While working with Nils Faergeman’s research group at USD’s Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mandrup and her team observed that human skin literally “talks” to other vital organs, including the liver, which is responsible for filtering out toxins and processing carbohydrates and fats. According to Science Daily, the team had been conducting research on so-called “knock-out” mice, or mice that lack a special fat-binding protein known as acyl-CoA-binding protein, when they made the discovery. Some of the mice had strange, greasy fur and were having difficulties being weaned from their mothers, prompting researchers to take a closer look. Since these same mice were having difficulties processing fat through their livers, instead accumulating it over time, the team initially assumed that this probably had something to do with their missing liver genes. But after taking a closer look and conducting a series of experiments, it became clear that there was some other factor involved in this metabolic abnormality. “At first we thought that the fat accumulation in the liver was linked with the fact that the gene was missing in the liver of the knock-out mice,” stated Ditte Neess, one of the researchers. “But this was ruled out by a series of studies, and we had to find another explanation.” Unhealthy skin can lead to unhealthy organs, reveals study When they decided to take a second look at the mice, a combination of greasy fur and what appeared to be “leaky” skin led the team to some new conclusions. Since the leaky skin mice appeared to be losing more water than the other mice, making them colder, researchers hypothesized that this, and not the missing gene, was somehow responsible for a corresponding fat accumulation in the mice’s livers. “When they lose water, they also lose heat,” added Neess. “We therefore asked ourselves whether this water and heat loss could be the reason why the mice accumulated fat in the liver and became weak when weaned from their mother.” As it turns out, this hypothesis was correct. The knock-out mice with the skin and fur problems were more prone to fat accumulation in their livers, and this was the result of their unhealthy skin. After applying a petroleum-based jelly to the coats of the mice in question, and later liquid latex, both of which stopped the heat loss in the mice, their fat accumulation issues also stopped. “We have showed that the skin affects the metabolism in the liver, and that is quite a surprise,” stated the team. “We believe that the leaking of water from the skin makes the mice feel cold, and that this leads to breaking down of fat in their adipose (fat) tissue. The broken down fat is then moved to the liver.  The mice move energy from the tissues to the liver.” READ...

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Research finds brain scans may aid in diagnosis of autism

Posted on Nov 6, 2013

Research finds brain scans may aid in diagnosis of autism

Joint research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Psychology and Auburn University indicates that brain scans show signs of autism that could eventually support behavior-based diagnosis of autism and effective early intervention therapies. The findings appear online today in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience as part of a special issue on brain connectivity in autism. “This research suggests brain connectivity as a neural signature of autism and may eventually support clinical testing for autism,” said Rajesh Kana, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology and the project’s senior researcher. “We found the information transfer between brain areas, causal influence of one brain area on another, to be weaker in autism.” The investigators found that brain connectivity data from 19 paths in brain scans predicted whether the participants had autism, with an accuracy rate of 95.9 percent. Kana, working with a team including Gopikrishna Deshpande, Ph.D., from Auburn University’s MRI Research Center, studied 15 high-functioning adolescents and adults with autism, as well as 15 typically developing control participants ages 16-34 years. Kana’s team collected all data in his autism lab at UAB that was then analyzed using a novel connectivity method at Auburn. The current study showed that adults with autism spectrum disorders processed social cues differently than typical controls. It also revealed the disrupted brain connectivity that explains their difficulty in understanding social processes. “We can see that there are consistently weaker brain regions due to the disrupted brain connectivity,” Kana said. “There’s a very clear difference.” Participants in this study were asked to choose the most logical of three possible endings as they watched a series of comic strip vignettes while a functional MRI scanner measured brain activity. The scenes included a glass about to fall off a table and a man enjoying the music of a street violinist and giving him a cash tip. Most participants in the autism group had difficulty in finding a logical end to the violinist scenario, which required an understanding of emotional and mental states. The current study showed that adults with autism spectrum disorders struggle to process subtle social cues, and altered brain connectivity may underlie their difficulty in understanding social processes. “We can see that the weaker connectivity hinders the cross-talk among brain regions in autism,” Kana said. Kana plans to continue his research on autism. “Over the next five to 10 years, our research is going in the direction of finding objective ways to supplement the diagnosis of autism with medical testing and testing the effectiveness of intervention in improving brain connectivity,” Kana said. Autism is currently diagnosed through interviews and behavioral observation. Although autism can be diagnosed by 18 months, in reality, earliest diagnoses occur around ages 4-6 as children face challenges in school or social settings. “Parents usually have a longer road before getting a firm diagnosis for their child now,” Kana said. “You lose a lot of intervention time, which is so critical. Brain imaging may not be able to replace the current diagnostic measures; but if it can supplement them at an earlier age, that’s going to be really helpful.” The findings of this study build on Kana’s research collaborations with Auburn that began in 2010. Lauren Libero, a graduate student in the UAB Department of Psychology, assisted in the research. READ...

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Interview of Dr. Robert O. Becker by Dan Rather on CBS’ 60 Minutes (13 February 1977)

Posted on Oct 8, 2013

Interview of Dr. Robert O. Becker by Dan Rather on CBS’ 60 Minutes (13 February 1977)

Way back in 1977, the late visionary scientist Robert O. Becker was expressing his concerns that the electrical frequencies around us might be causing human health problems.  Here’s a transcript of some historical footage that is very relevant today, as we wrestle with the complex, energy-related illnesses of the 21st century. Dan Rather: You may have heard of it—a Navy project called Seafarer. The original name was Sanguine. It’s a $700,000,000 submarine communications system that for the past decade has been a very expensive idea in search of a home. In every part of the country where the Navy has set foot talking Seafarer, there has been an uproar. Homefolks, politicians, scientists—they all turn out to have at it. Will Seafarer ruin the scenery? Will it be a major target for enemy warheads? And most important, what about reports that it could be harmful to the people who would have to live with it?… Captain Charles Pollack is the man in charge. Capt. Pollack: The antenna would have about 2400 miles of antenna cable. If you draw a line around the extremities of that antenna-arrayed layout, it would encompass about 4000 square miles. Dan Rather: So, somewhere in the good old U.S. of A., Pollack has to string out 2400 miles of antenna cable, buried a few feet underground. It would look something like this—a pattern resembling loose strings in a tennis racket. The intersecting lines would be about 3½ miles apart, and the whole thing would cover 4000 square miles of field and forest—some of it along existing right-of-ways, like roads and powerlines, some of it through newly cleared paths. Is it safe? Capt. Pollack: Yes, absolutely. Dan Rather: Absolutely? Well not to people like this scientist. Are you telling me there’s a possibility that electric current, generated in a fashion such as this, could possibly cause heart disease and/or stroke? Dr. Becker: Yes. Dan Rather: You have to know that that’s a mind-blowing thought for a lot of people, including me? Dr. Becker: I’m aware of that. Dan Rather: Dr. Robert Becker is Chief of Orthopedic Surgery and a medical investigator for the Veterans Administration in Syracuse, New York. We have to pause here for a bit of explanation. Historically, the scientific community, almost in its entirety, has maintained that, to be harmed by electricity, you had to be shocked or burned; that the low-level doses surrounding us most of the time—from electrical appliances in the home, from power transmission lines or from the Navy’s Seafarer project—could do us no harm. That’s the Navy’s argument. Now, are you telling me it’s fair to say, accurate to say, that a housewife is exposed to more low frequencies in her home in the course of doing her day-to-day chores than she would be from Seafarer? Capt. Pollack: Many, many times more. Dan Rather: You’re certain that is a scientific fact? Capt. Pollack: That is a scientific fact. Dan Rather: Dr. Becker wouldn’t disagree with that. What he’d say is that you may not be safe, even in your kitchen. For twenty years, he and his staff have been experimenting on the effects, if any, of low-level radiation on living things. He is one of a small, but growing group of scientists around the world who are turning up information making them believe that low-level electrical fields do affect us. For instance, using very low voltage currents, he has made broken bones that wouldn’t heal by themselves grow together again. And like most scientific discoveries, it’s a double-edged sword. If those carefully controlled low-level currents can heal bones, well, it...

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