Brain

Alzheimer’s breakthrough hailed as ‘turning point’

Posted on Oct 11, 2013

The discovery of the first chemical to prevent the death of brain tissue in a neurodegenerative disease has been hailed as the “turning point” in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. More work is needed to develop a drug that could be taken by patients. But scientists say a resulting medicine could treat Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and other diseases. In tests on mice, the Medical Research Council showed all brain cell death from prion disease could be prevented. Prof Roger Morris, from King’s College London, said: “This finding, I suspect, will be judged by history as a turning point in the search for medicines to control and prevent Alzheimer’s disease.” He told the BBC a cure for Alzheimer’s was not imminent but: “I’m very excited, it’s the first proof in any living animal that you can delay neurodegeneration. “The world won’t change tomorrow, but this is a landmark study.” Cells starve The research team at the Medical Research Council Toxicology Unit, based at the University of Leicester, focused on the natural defence mechanisms built into brain cells. When a virus hijacks a brain cell it leads to a build-up of viral proteins. Cells respond by shutting down nearly all protein production in order to halt the virus’s spread. However, many neurodegenerative diseases involve the production of faulty or “misfolded” proteins. These activate the same defences, but with more severe consequences. The misfolded proteins linger and the brain cells shut down protein production for so long that they eventually starve themselves to death. This process, repeated in neurons throughout the brain, can destroy movement or memory or even kill, depending on the disease. This process is thought to take place in many forms of neurodegeneration, so safely disrupting it could treat a wide range of diseases. The researchers used a compound which prevented those defence mechanisms kicking in and in turn halted neurodegeneration. Analysis It is rare to get cautious scientists keen to describe a study in mice as a turning point in treating Alzheimer’s. It is early science, a lot can go wrong between a drug for mice and a drug for humans and the only published data is for prion disease, not even Alzheimer’s. So why the excitement? It is the first time that any form of neurodegeneration has been completely halted, so it is a significant landmark. It shows that the process being targeted has serious potential. If this can be successfully developed, which is not guaranteed, the prize would be huge. In Parkinson’s the alpha-synuclein protein goes wrong, in Alzheimer’s it’s amyloid and tau, in Huntington’s it’s the Huntingtin protein. But the errant protein is irrelevant here as the researchers are targeting the way a cell deals with any misfolded protein. It means one drug could cure many diseases and that really would be something to get excited about. The study, published in Science Translational Medicine, showed mice with prion disease developed severe memory and movement problems. They died within 12 weeks. However, those given the compound showed no sign of brain tissue wasting away. Lead researcher Prof Giovanna Mallucci told the BBC news website: “They were absolutely fine, it was extraordinary. “What’s really exciting is a compound has completely prevented neurodegeneration and that’s a first. “This isn’t the compound you would use in people, but it means we can do it and it’s a start.” She said the compound offered a “new pathway that may well give protective drugs” and the next step was for drug companies to develop a medicine for use in humans. ‘Very dramatic’ Prof Mallucci’s lab is also testing the compound on...

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Interview of Dr. Robert O. Becker by Dan Rather on CBS’ 60 Minutes (13 February 1977)

Posted on Oct 8, 2013

Interview of Dr. Robert O. Becker by Dan Rather on CBS’ 60 Minutes (13 February 1977)

Way back in 1977, the late visionary scientist Robert O. Becker was expressing his concerns that the electrical frequencies around us might be causing human health problems.  Here’s a transcript of some historical footage that is very relevant today, as we wrestle with the complex, energy-related illnesses of the 21st century. Dan Rather: You may have heard of it—a Navy project called Seafarer. The original name was Sanguine. It’s a $700,000,000 submarine communications system that for the past decade has been a very expensive idea in search of a home. In every part of the country where the Navy has set foot talking Seafarer, there has been an uproar. Homefolks, politicians, scientists—they all turn out to have at it. Will Seafarer ruin the scenery? Will it be a major target for enemy warheads? And most important, what about reports that it could be harmful to the people who would have to live with it?… Captain Charles Pollack is the man in charge. Capt. Pollack: The antenna would have about 2400 miles of antenna cable. If you draw a line around the extremities of that antenna-arrayed layout, it would encompass about 4000 square miles. Dan Rather: So, somewhere in the good old U.S. of A., Pollack has to string out 2400 miles of antenna cable, buried a few feet underground. It would look something like this—a pattern resembling loose strings in a tennis racket. The intersecting lines would be about 3½ miles apart, and the whole thing would cover 4000 square miles of field and forest—some of it along existing right-of-ways, like roads and powerlines, some of it through newly cleared paths. Is it safe? Capt. Pollack: Yes, absolutely. Dan Rather: Absolutely? Well not to people like this scientist. Are you telling me there’s a possibility that electric current, generated in a fashion such as this, could possibly cause heart disease and/or stroke? Dr. Becker: Yes. Dan Rather: You have to know that that’s a mind-blowing thought for a lot of people, including me? Dr. Becker: I’m aware of that. Dan Rather: Dr. Robert Becker is Chief of Orthopedic Surgery and a medical investigator for the Veterans Administration in Syracuse, New York. We have to pause here for a bit of explanation. Historically, the scientific community, almost in its entirety, has maintained that, to be harmed by electricity, you had to be shocked or burned; that the low-level doses surrounding us most of the time—from electrical appliances in the home, from power transmission lines or from the Navy’s Seafarer project—could do us no harm. That’s the Navy’s argument. Now, are you telling me it’s fair to say, accurate to say, that a housewife is exposed to more low frequencies in her home in the course of doing her day-to-day chores than she would be from Seafarer? Capt. Pollack: Many, many times more. Dan Rather: You’re certain that is a scientific fact? Capt. Pollack: That is a scientific fact. Dan Rather: Dr. Becker wouldn’t disagree with that. What he’d say is that you may not be safe, even in your kitchen. For twenty years, he and his staff have been experimenting on the effects, if any, of low-level radiation on living things. He is one of a small, but growing group of scientists around the world who are turning up information making them believe that low-level electrical fields do affect us. For instance, using very low voltage currents, he has made broken bones that wouldn’t heal by themselves grow together again. And like most scientific discoveries, it’s a double-edged sword. If those carefully controlled low-level currents can heal bones, well, it...

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DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies

Posted on Oct 2, 2013

DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies

Only 10% of our DNA is used for building proteins, while the other 90% are called “Junk DNA” Russian researchers have joined linguists and geneticists in a venture to explore those 90% of “junk DNA.” Their results, findings and conclusions are astounding. THE HUMAN DNA IS A BIOLOGICAL INTERNET, and superior in many aspects to the electronic one.  Russian scientific research may explain phenomena such as clairvoyance, intuition, spontaneous and remote acts of healing, self healing, affirmation techniques, unusual light/auras around people such as gurus and spiritual masters, humans influencing weather patterns and much more.  In addition, there is evidence for a whole new type of medicine in which DNA can be influenced and reprogrammed without cutting out and replacing genes. Only 10% of our DNA is used for building proteins.  It is this subset of DNA that is of most interest to western researchers..  The other 90% has been traditionally considered “junk DNA.”  Russian linguists Grayna Fosar and Franz Bludorf recently joined geneticists in a venture to explore those 90% of “junk DNA.”   Their results, findings and conclusions are simply revolutionary.  According to their research, our DNA is not only responsible for the construction of our body but also serves as data storage and in communication.   Fosar and  Bludorf found that the genetic code, especially in the apparently useless 90%, follows the same rules as all our human languages.   To this end they compared the rules of syntax (the way in which words are put together to form phrases and sentences), semantics (the study of meaning in language forms) and the basic rules of grammar.  They found that the alkalines of our DNA follow a regular grammar and do have set rules, just like our languages. Their conclusion is that human languages did not appear coincidentally but are a reflection of our inherent DNA. The Russian biophysicist and molecular biologist Pjotr Garjajev and his colleagues also explored the vibrational behavior of DNA.   Their conclusion: “Living chromosomes function just like solitonic/holographic computers using the endogenous DNA laser radiation.” Garjajev managed to modulate certain frequency patterns onto a laser ray and with it influenced the DNA frequency and thus the genetic information itself.  Since the basic structure of DNA-alkaline pairs and of language (as explained earlier) are of the same structure, no DNA decoding is necessary.  One can simply use words and sentences of the human language. This, too, was experimentally proven.  Living DNA substance reacts to language-modulated laser rays and even to radio waves, if the proper frequencies are being used. This finally and scientifically explains why affirmations, autogenous training, hypnosis and the like can have such strong effects on humans and their bodies. It is entirely natural for our DNA to react to language.  While western researchers cut single genes from the DNA strands and insert them elsewhere, the Russians enthusiastically worked on devices that can influence the cellular metabolism through suitable modulated radio and light frequencies and thus repair genetic defects. For example, Garjajev’s research group succeeded in proving that with this method, chromosomes damaged by x-rays can be repaired. They captured information patterns of a particular section of DNA and transmitted it onto another, thus reprogramming cells to another genome.  Remarkably, they were able to successfully transform frog embryos to salamander embryos, simply by transmitting frog DNA information patterns.  Using this mechanism, DNA information was transmitted without any of the side effects or disharmonies encountered when cutting out and re-introducing single genes from DNA.   This represents a  fundamental shift in our understanding and capabilities in transforming DNA.   Large-scale changes in DNA expression appear to be...

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Laser Light Zaps Away Cocaine Addiction

Posted on Sep 28, 2013

Laser Light Zaps Away Cocaine Addiction

By stimulating one part of the brain with laser light, researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center at UC San Francisco (UCSF) have shown that they can wipe away addictive behavior in rats – or conversely turn non-addicted rats into compulsive cocaine seekers.  “When we turn on a laser light in the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex, the compulsive cocaine seeking is gone,” said Antonello Bonci, MD, scientific director of the intramural research program at the NIH’s National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), where the work was done. Bonci is also an adjunct professor of neurology at UCSF and an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University. Described this week in the journal Nature, the new study demonstrates the central role the prefrontal cortex plays in compulsive cocaine addiction. It also suggests a new therapy that could be tested immediately in humans, said Billy Chen of NIDA, the lead author of the study. Any new human therapy would not be based on using lasers, but would most likely rely on electromagnetic stimulation outside the scalp, in particular a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Clinical trials are now being designed to test whether this approach works, Chen added. The High Cost of Cocaine Abuse Cocaine abuse is a major public health problem in the United States today, and it places a heavy toll on society in terms of lost job productivity, lost earnings, cocaine-related crime, incarcerations, investigations, and treatment and prevention programs. Antonello Bonci, MD The human toll is even greater, with an estimated 1.4 million Americans addicted to the drug. It is frequently the cause of emergency room visits – 482,188 in 2008 alone – and it is a top cause of heart attacks and strokes for people under 35. One of the hallmarks of cocaine addiction is compulsive drug taking – the loss of ability to refrain from taking the drug even if it’s destroying one’s life. What makes the new work so promising, said Bonci, is that Chen and his colleagues were working with an animal model that mimics this sort of compulsive cocaine addiction. The animals, like human addicts, are more likely to make bad decisions and take cocaine even when they are conditioned to expect self-harm associated with it. Electrophysiological studies involving these rats have shown that they have extremely low activity in the prefrontal cortex – a brain region fundamental for impulse control, decision making and behavioral flexibility. Similar studies that imaged the brains of humans have shown the same pattern of low activity in this region in people who are compulsively addicted to cocaine. Altering Brain Activity with a Laser To test whether altering the activity in this brain region could impact addiction, Chen and his colleagues employed a technique called optogenetics to shut the activity on and off using a laser. First they took light-sensitive proteins called rhodopsins and used genetic engineering to insert them into neurons in the rat’s prefrontal cortex. Activating this region with a laser tuned to the rhodopsins turned the nerve cells on and off. Turning on these cells wiped out the compulsive behavior, while switching them off turned the non-addicted ones into addicted, researchers found. What’s exciting, said Bonci, is that there is a way to induce a similar activation of the prelimbic cortex in people through a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which applies an external electromagnetic field to the brain and has been used as a treatment for symptoms of depression. Bonci and his colleagues plan to begin clinical trials at NIH in which...

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Change Gene Expression and Increase Glutathione with Relaxation Techniques

Posted on Sep 24, 2013

Change Gene Expression and Increase Glutathione with Relaxation Techniques

Dr. Herbert Benson did a study comparing 16 people who have regularly evoked “the relaxation response” to 19 people that didn’t use these techniques.. Roughly 2,000 genes differed between the groups. Many genes that triggered inflammation and cell death were turned off in the group that regularly practiced relaxation techniques.

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